If you’re poor, the only way you’re likely to injure someone is the old traditional way: artisanal violence, we could call it – by hands, by knife, by club, or maybe modern hands-on violence, by gun or by car.
But if you’re tremendously wealthy, you can practice industrial-scale violence without any manual labor on your own part. You can, say, build a sweatshop factory that will collapse in Bangladesh and kill more people than any hands-on mass murderer ever did, or you can calculate risk and benefit about putting poisons or unsafe machines into the world, as manufacturers do every day. If you’re the leader of a country, you can declare war and kill by the hundreds of thousands or millions. And the nuclear superpowers – the US and Russia – still hold the option of destroying quite a lot of life on Earth.

So do the carbon barons. But when we talk about violence, we almost always talk about violence from below, not above.

Or so I thought when I received a press release last week from a climate group announcing that ” scientists say there is a direct link between changing climate and an increase in violence”. What the scientists actually said, in a not-so-newsworthy article in Nature two and a half years ago, is that there is higher conflict in the tropics in El Nino years, and that perhaps this will scale up to make our age of climate change also an era of civil and international conflict.

The message is that ordinary people will behave badly in an era of intensified climate change.

Poster for the 67th Cannes Film festival, featuring image of Marcello Mastroianni from Federico Fellini’s 8 1/2

Eberhard Eggers, Twins, 1939

Eberhard Eggers, Twins, 1939

empty Presbyterian Church in Detroit, Michigan, photo by Michael Frank

French poster for JE T’AIME JE T’AIME (Alain Resnais, France, 1968), designed by René Ferracci

German film poster for Last Year in Marienbad (Alain Resnais, France, 1961), artist: Tostmann

Jennifer Dionisio, Illustration for Amelia’s Magazine, 2013

Jennifer Dionisio, Illustration for Amelia’s Magazine, 2013

Jennifer Dionisio, 2013
Pianofuzz Estudio, Collage, 2011

Pianofuzz Estudio, Collage, 2011

Hamada Chimei, Irritating B, 1975

Hamada Chimei, Irritating B, 1975

Alex MacLean, Dinghies clustered around dock, Duxbury, Massachusetts, 1993

Alex MacLean, Bathers in wave pool, Orlando, Florida, 1999